Are you among the 41% of Spaniards willing to taste the cultured meat?

We have carried out the first survey of cultured meat in Spain! The aim was to analyze the perception we have of a new product, still unknown but called to lead the future of food. If you want to know the result, read on!

One of the biggest obstacles facing any innovative product is the lack of knowledge that we as consumers have. Even more, if we talk about food. A concrete definition of the product, which clearly explains its preparation and origin is very important.

Cultured meat is based on the natural construction of tissues from animal cells, developing controlled biological environments but without genetic modification. This process results in obtaining animal meat that respects the animal welfare since it avoids their sacrifice (the cell sample obtained from a simple biopsy). The purpose is to offer the consumer a product of high protein content, completely natural, nutritious, and sustainable with the environment, with savings in land and water resources and emissions generated by intensive livestock farming.

More demanding and aware of animal welfare

The main conclusion is that 41% of Spanish buyers say that they will probably taste the grown meat when it reaches the market. Of these, 21.7% say that “for sure” they would be willing to try these products. Men (24.1%) are somewhat more likely to test “for sure” than women (19.3%). Moreover, for an additional 19%, it would be “likely” to do so. On the other hand, 22% are still reluctant to try meat produced by non-traditional means.

Age matters too. 24% of respondents between the ages of 20 and 40 would try cultured meat, while for those between 41 and 55 the figure drops slightly to 19%.

While 85% of respondents define themselves as consumers of any type of meat, 35% say they have heard, read, or seen news and reports about the transmission of animal diseases to humans through food. Concern about these diseases is a very important variable in purchasing habits.

You should always look at what it says on the label! Logical. Nutritional values turn out to be another of the decisive aspects when it comes to valuing a food product. In this respect, 35% of surveyed consider that the composition of food is key to putting it in the shopping basket.

One of every three citizens considers cultivated meat to be healthier

And what is the overall assessment made by consumers? Well, 33.5% of those surveyed perceive these future meat products produced by non-traditional means to be healthier, in front of traditional industrial farming. Also, this type of products, among which is the ‘cultivated meat’, tend to project very appreciated values in our current society such as greater animal welfare (53%), food safety (40%), respect for the environment (42%) or benefits for people with obesity and cholesterol problems (38%).

Surveyed who are willing to try cultured meat admit that the aspects they find most convincing are the composition of the product (35%), its commitment to animal welfare (34%), and its nutritional values (24%).

However, the level of importance they place on each quality of cultured meat varies by age. Thus, for those who are between 20 and 40 years old, the most outstanding feature of the product is its commitment to animal welfare (71%) and no fat in its composition (70%). When we talk about consumers between 41 and 55 years old, the most valued thing is the nutritional value (70%) and healthy effect on people (60%). 

In general, less environmental impact and the need to raise animals, and the lower risks for public health are the possible benefits of cultured meat that are most attractive in our society and other countries.

Price is another aspect to consider when marketing a new product. 31% of surveyed believe that products made from cultured meat will have similar prices to traditional meat products. Conversely, 29% think that cultured meat products will have higher prices.

Would you be willing to try cultured meat?

[The survey was carried out through 1,000 online interviews (statistical margin of error of ± 3.2%), from 20 to 55 years old, currently living in five big Spanish cities based on weighting criterion on their populations: Barcelona, Bilbao, Madrid, Seville, and Valencia. The average age of the respondents was 39,7].

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